Dating frankoma pottery

dating frankoma pottery

How do you identify Frankoma Pottery?

Frankoma pieces made since 1954 sport a red clay from Sapulpa, Oklahoma, while older wares were formed with a tan-colored clay dug at Ada, Oklahoma. Using source names, Sapulpa and Ada, along with glaze colors and item styles, collectors can identify and date Frankoma Pottery. The Great Southwest served as inspiration for many Frankoma works.

How did Frankoma Potteries get their name?

Grace Lee made the suggestion that because they were the only commercial pottery in Oklahoma, they should use their last name Frank and add the letters O, M, and an A for Oklahoma for the name Frankoma Potteries.

What color is Frankoma clay?

Many people associate Frankoma entirely with its medium-green glaze that seemed rather dated and unattractive for quite a few years. Since both these colors were used extensively over time, its the type of clay used in the piece rather than the color of the glaze, which determines its value.

How can you tell how old a Frankoma Christmas card is?

The Christmas cards from the 1940s and 1950s are rare finds. Dating Frankoma pieces is fairly simple. Look at the bottom of the piece. First, if the clay used appears to be a tan color, then it was created pre-1955 from Ada clay which was mined near the southern Oklahoma town of Ada.

How can I tell how old a Frankoma piece is?

Dating Frankoma pieces is fairly simple. Look at the bottom of the piece. First, if the clay used appears to be a tan color, then it was created pre-1955 from Ada clay which was mined near the southern Oklahoma town of Ada. After 1955, most pieces were produced from the local Sapulpa red clay.

What colors does Frankoma Pottery come in?

While most people think of Frankoma pottery as being produced in the popular colors of Prairie Green and Desert Gold, Frankoma produced many items in Woodland Moss, Brown Satin, Peach Glow, Clay Blue, Red Bud, Sunflower Yellow, Robin Egg blue and other colors.

How did Frankoma Potteries get their name?

Grace Lee made the suggestion that because they were the only commercial pottery in Oklahoma, they should use their last name Frank and add the letters O, M, and an A for Oklahoma for the name Frankoma Potteries.

Does Frankoma Pottery contain lead?

The Frankoma Family Collectors Association website reported getting many queries about lead being an issue when using this pottery for food service. In its frequently asked questions section, the site assures readers that food and Frankoma do indeed mix well.

How can I tell how old a Frankoma piece is?

Dating Frankoma pieces is fairly simple. Look at the bottom of the piece. First, if the clay used appears to be a tan color, then it was created pre-1955 from Ada clay which was mined near the southern Oklahoma town of Ada. After 1955, most pieces were produced from the local Sapulpa red clay.

What colors does Frankoma Pottery come in?

While most people think of Frankoma pottery as being produced in the popular colors of Prairie Green and Desert Gold, Frankoma produced many items in Woodland Moss, Brown Satin, Peach Glow, Clay Blue, Red Bud, Sunflower Yellow, Robin Egg blue and other colors.

How many Christmas cards did the Franks send?

The Franks began sending the Christmas cards in 1944 using miniature items from their current stock, but from 1953-1973 special Christmas card molds were developed to be sent to the Frank family members, friends and Frankoma dealers. Since the cards were never intended to be for sale, no records exist on how many Christmas cards were produced.

How much is a Frankoma painting worth?

Though the older Frankoma pieces are hard to find and priced quite high, selling from several hundred dollars per piece to several thousand when sold by a knowledgeable dealer, the more recent Frankoma works have garnered some increased interest.

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